The Lady Can Rock! Lady Geraldine Pays Tribute To Old Hollywood With ‘Fast Cars & Movie Stars’

The life of Geraldine Elliott feels like a work of fiction, with every combination of heartache and achievement; it epitomises the strength of a woman who went from being profoundly deaf as a child, to discovering sound after an operation in her early twenties that ignited her love of music in a way no-one who has always been able to hear could possibly imagine. Add to that an abusive and violent marriage, followed her resurgence as a celebrated entrepreneur and you are just about starting to get a true understanding as to why she has become such an inspirational figure. Her latest album, Fast Cars & Movie Stars, is her most accomplished yet, marrying stellar production with melodic riffs and Lady G’s signature, crystalline vocals.

Fast Cars and Movie Stars is in many ways the album Lady Geraldine has always been destined to make. Always one foot rooted in her life experiences, she sets off an a theatrical, sometimes eerie, journey through the self-destructive nature of love, the shattered American Dream and the ultimate triumph of the human spirit. The strange otherworldliness of Hollywood glamour is the perfect backdrop to Lady Geraldine’s songs, her own story packing in more cliff-hangers and twists in the tale than any number of blockbusters.

Who is Lady Geraldine and what is her story?

Lady Geraldine was a blues singer you would fully understand where her inspirations came from, with a life full of sadness, struggle and adversity, followed by success. She is a woman who should be an inspiration to others across the country, and the world – women who are told they cannot achieve anything, women who are bullied and assaulted – but as Geraldine has shown through pure female spirit, it is possible to spread your wings and take on anything.

Geraldine grew up in Bristol, learning very little as a child from standard education due in no small part to her being totally misunderstood as a pupil and thus being placed at the back of the class. It was assumed she was just not able to learn easily instead of understanding that she was profoundly deaf.

Life didn’t get any easier for Geraldine during her teenage years, although she proved to herself that she could learn fast by becoming adept at lip reading. At the age of sixteen, with her mother now pregnant, she was encouraged to get married and entered a relationship with an older man, who, after their wedding day, immediately started with physical and mental abuse. This continued unabated for the duration of their short relationship, until she could take no more, packed her bags, escaped to the safety of a rented room and divorced him.

During her early twenties a life-changing opportunity presented itself and Geraldine was given the chance to have a major operation to sort out her profound deafness by reconstructing her inner ear and implanting an ear drum. The result was immediate and truly awe-inspiring, introducing her not only to the wonders of music which she had only previously encountered by attending her mother’s local concerts during the time when she was deaf, but also the strange experience of truly hearing for the first time, epitomised by her breakfast cornflakes which to her was so loud she had to wear ear defenders to eat them.

Whilst coming to terms with her new found, sound-filled world, Geraldine found new love and married again, this time travelling the world drawing on experiences for her music, but also starting to paint and discovering her artistic nature which for so long had been submerged in a life of turmoil. Although again, sadly, this relationship did not work out, she settled in Scotland and soon became a successful business woman being written about in the media with her innovative ‘Edinburgh Dolls Hospital’ which became something of a national phenomenon.  Subsequently, this led Geraldine on a new path when a legendary producer and songwriter literally walked into her life via her doll’s hospital. They got chatting and it became clear that there was a natural affinity and his background with the likes of Wet, Wet, Wet through to Big Country, touched an emotional chord with her, a partnership which is now unbreakable.

Now having created her music project, whilst also building a hugely successful jewellery business at the same time, Geraldine is starting a new chapter in her life that will see her releasing music, shooting videos, and in turn, maybe by getting her lifetime experiences out to the public, it will give people who have suffered tough times through health issues or marital issues, the strength to achieve what they have never thought possible.

 

The Good Water Are Serving The Retro-Vibes With New Single ‘Tell Me What To Do’

Birmingham psych-rockers The Good Water are back with their new single Tell Me What To Do and a new set of live dates. The fuzz-powered 3 minutes of catchy retro-rock showcases 60s pop melodies alongside blistering guitar work and follows radio airplay with Steve Lamacq, Mary-Anne Hobbes, Tom Robinson and Shaun Keaveny for their singles See Your Light and Mansaid.

Tell Me What To Do is all about confusion, the misunderstanding of feelings, and the inevitable heartache that follows,” explains frontman Rob Clements. “The upbeat bounce of the track is synonymous with a Northern Soul style groove – a genre that is steeped in teenage angst, with talcum powder and tears on the dance floor.

Since forming in early 2015, The Good Water have been busy. The boys quickly picked up loyal support from Brum Radio with their drone-rock debut single Everything Is, gained new fans at raucous shows around the Midlands and blew away audiences supporting Mercury Rev, Super Furry Animals and Bill Ryder-Jones. The trio’s brand of psychedelic rock grooves and nimble riffs is streamlined into tight retro-pop frameworks, and press has also been quick to spot their talents with rave reviews from tastemaker blogs and magazines. Their two 2017 singles gained big support from BBC 6Music and BBC Introducing, with a host of DJs spinning the track and supporting the band.

The Good Water are on tour with Canadian rockers The Sheepdogs in October/November –

29/10 – The Workman’s Club, DUBLIN.

30/10 – The Brudenell Social Club, LEEDS.

31/10 – The Fleece, BRISTOL.

1/11 – The Globe, CARDIFF.

2/11 – The Actress & Bishop, BIRMINGHAM.

5/11 – The Borderline, LONDON.

Check them out on the links below:

thegoodwater.co.uk

facebook.com/thegoodwatermusic

twitter.com/thegoodwater

instagram.com/the_good_water